November 20, 2008

A very good option

The University of the Philippines Health Service is a 50-bed primary care hospital located inside UP Diliman. For the students, faculty, employees and dependents of UP, consultations with physicians are free. For faculty and employees, the free service extends even after retirement—a boon in one's senior years when health care costs shoot up. Not being from UP myself, I do not know if other services like laboratory tests are also free. What I am sure of is that 'outsiders' may also avail themselves of their health services, and at a very low cost compared to private clinics, hospitals and healthcare systems. I had to bring our maid to the UP Health Service recently for a recurring fever and my bill—consultation with a family physician, complete blood count (CBC) and urinalysis—came to a grand total of only PhP315, just a little above US$6. She's okay now, in case you're wondering—the recurring fever was caused by a mild infection which just required an antibiotic.

University of the Philippines Health Service

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18 comments:

Olivier said...

architecture surprenante, cela me fait penser a une petite église.

amazing architecture, it makes me think of a small church.

USelaine said...

We can only dream of such economical health care!

Saretta said...

Great prices! That's wonderful!

turtle said...

good value for money indeed. another positive, i think doctors going there are specialists. used to go to UP-Manila HS when in training as resident years ago and noticed those who saw us when sick were really specialists. perhaps same with Diliman.

lunarossa said...

Sound excellent, Hilda. Do they accept patients from abroad as well? I'd better not express my opinion on the UK NHS, I can only say that's like a lottery. Take care. Ciao. Antonella

Jackie said...

It's great that you have affordable health facilities that you can access - it must be such a relief. Does the Philippines have a national health insurance system, or is it all private?

MurciaDailyPhoto and www.asthes.tk said...

I am glad that she is better health.
Then, as the post earlier in the Philippines there is a national health system?

angela said...

That's excellent, Hilda. How lucky students and employees of the university are. I guess with free health care as part of the package it isn't difficult to attract good quality teachers.

hadv said...

Hahaha.. I have old memories and old UP jokes about that clinic. I almost got my ears pierced (on a dare) in that clinic, but backed out because I was scared of getting tetanus.

Per Stromsjo said...

Good to hear that she's ok now.

I imagine there is some tax money involved as well in keeping this health care business running with such low fees.

You won't get far on $6 in Stockholm, still the patient only pays a fraction of the total cost and tax payers carry the rest.

JM said...

Very nice architecture and good information on your post. Well done!

the donG said...

galing! murang mura nga. buti talaga na may ganyan dyan.

Layrayski said...

that is more than a good option! Nice to know about this.

Putra Riau said...

Absolutly nice option...

Halcyon said...

I'm glad that some places still offer affordable healthcare!

Of course, the healthcare system in France is great, but you do pay for it with your taxes - and they are quite expensive! Here in the US, I have a $15 co-pay to see the doctor. But that's only because I have health insurance through my employer. Without that, I'd probably be paying $100 just to see a doctor, not including any tests or medications. Although I think healthcare will change under Obama, it will never be like in France or other European countries. Americans would find that too "socialist". Already many of my colleagues are already complaining that we are going to a socialist society with the election of BO. The ignorance of some people often amazes me. :S

Hilda said...

Angela:
We do, sort of. We have PhilHealth, but it doesn't reach everyone. Mostly, it's those employed by companies who have it. I'm not quite sure how it works because it seems to apply only to hospital confinement. Most poor Filipinos would have to go to the emergency room of government hospitals or to their community health center (if they have one) to be able to consult with a doctor. Many in the Philippines do not even have that basic service available to them.

Per:
Yes, taxpayers definitely carry a large part of the cost here. Of the entire university, in fact, since it's a state university.

Agnes:
I've had nothing but good experiences there, fortunately. I used to go there myself when I was a freelance for several years and had no health insurance. While we were walking to the room of the particular doctor who was going to see our maid, I checked the names on the door and was surprised that I recognized quite a few of them.

Webradio said...

This building is like a little church...

Kat Manalo said...

Just lust October, when I thought I had dengue fever (and was scared to inform my parents I'm sick) , I also had my complete blood at UP Health Service and since I am a graduate student I paid only 21 pesos!!! (0.5 USD!!!)

Haha. I love UP. (And I'm beginning to like following your blog po hehe)