December 9, 2009

Stoop

I've already shown several photos of the historic building of the Museum of the Filipino People. Now, let's finally step inside (yes, they allow photos of the exhibits as long as you don't use a flash). The museum is the repository of much of the archeological treasures discovered all over the Philippines, hence the name. One of the first things you will see upon entering the museum is the garden in the middle, which has a replica of a traditional Ifugao house. The Ifugao are one of several tribal peoples who live in the Cordillera mountain range north of Metro Manila (it is also the name of the province where they live). The thickly thatched roof shelters the entire house down to the level of the raised floor, necessary in the rains and cold weather of the mountains. This means that one has to stoop or squat to get to the ladder which leads to the doorway.

replica of a traditional Ifugao house

Inside the museum, there is a model of another Ifugao house, which has as many varieties as there are Ifugao sub-groups. The model is not accurate in its use of materials, however. Bamboo slats will not provide much shelter from the cold winds that blow throughout the Cordilleras.

model of a traditional Ifugao house

If you want to see the colorful handwoven traditional dress of the Igorot, the generic term used for the six distinct ethno-linguistic groups of the Cordilleras including the Ifugao, the tourists we saw at Mines View Park in Baguio City last year wore them for their souvenir photo.

16 comments:

Cezar and Léia said...

Hello dear Hilda,
wow it's very interesting!I specially liked the second picture with those miniatures, just lovely!
Léia

Misalyn said...

Hi Ms. Hilda.Ang ganda ng second photo.

Thanks for sharing this. Ang hirap talaga maging dayuhan sa sariling bansa.

Pag nakakauwi kasi sa Pinas kulang na kulang ang oras para puntahan ang mga lugar na tulad nito.

Jacob said...

That's interesting. Native Floridians used thatch, also, to build Tiki huts (still do, in fact)...but the Tiki huts are built like a dome and the thatch goes all the way to the ground.

I'm not sure how well they protect one from the weather, either.

bfarr said...

Very intersting post Hilda. I checked out the linked post as well, very colorful.

Eki said...

i always intrigued by traditional houses like this. they tell a lot about local wisdom and knowledge. could you show us the photo of thatched roof please, Hilda?

Don and Krise said...

This is so interesting. You really do your homework Hilda.

Olivier said...

très belle cette hutte avec toutes les sculptures.

Firefly said...

HI Hilda. I have to apologise. You pop into my Port Elizabeth Daily Photo blog so often and I come by just about never. Thanks for comments you always leave.

I assume that the raised floor of these house are about a meter and a half above the ground. I also take that its that way that things can be stored under the house and that water can run through freely.

Vogon Poet said...

Exhibitions where photos are allowed are always more interesting. The models may be not accurate but they are anywhow amazing and fascinating.

Louis la Vache said...

«Louis» appreciates these cultural tidbits! Good post, Hilda!

Frank said...

Great post Hilda! I just think this house is fascinating. The construction (aside from the thatching) looks as though it would stand up to some pretty rough winds and weather. The carved statue and bench and other items on the porch are so-so interesting.

Halcyon said...

Nice photos and interesting story/background.

Can you climb inside the model homes or are they just miniature versions?

Priyanka Khot said...

Hi Hilda,

I really like these kinds of theme based museums. I visited one such museum in Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India.

The little model shows a lot of details. The craftsmanship is commendable.

JM said...

The Ifugao house model is just lovely!

Hilda said...

Halcyon:
I think you can actually climb in but it's pretty small and claustrophobic so none in our tour group even tried.

the donG said...

still am in awe seeing bloggers visit museum. this might be the first that i need to visit as taking of photos is allowed. great too if you see those houses in ifugao.