June 28, 2009

Where is our blogger?

Here's a funny thing about Philippine national hero Jose Rizal: though he is considered a hero against Spanish colonial rule, he never asked for independence from Spain. In fact, a review of his writings showed that he wanted Spain to recognize the Philippines as a province rather than a colony. All he wanted was for Spain to recognize Filipinos as equals, with the same rights before the law, and the freedom of assembly and speech, as Spaniards. The civic group that he formed, La Liga Filipina, advocated reforms through legal and peaceful means. But because of the publication in Europe of his novels Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo, both of which were very critical of Spanish friars, he was declared an enemy of the state by Spanish authorities. Despite disavowing the revolution, he was arrested, court-martialed and executed by firing squad. Wielding a pen and ophthalmoscope rather than a sword and pistol, Rizal, through his writings and martyrdom, served as the catalyst for the Philippine Revolution. This painting depicting Jose Rizal's trial, imprisonment and execution hangs in the Rizal Shrine, a museum inside Fort Santiago.

painting of the execution of Jose Rizal

Freedom of assembly and speech—that was all the protesters in Iran were exercising before their government began the violent crackdown against them. Freedom of expression—that was all our fellow City Daily Photo blogger from Tehran was exercising before he was arrested with hundreds of his countrymen.

Today, the CDP community is posting in support of his freedom and the freedom of all Iran. Click here to view thumbnails for all participants.

And if you feel strongly enough against the violence to lend your name to a petition to be sent to all members of the Organization of Islamic Conference, the Non-Aligned Movement, and all UN member states, then go to Avaaz's Iran: Stop the Crackdown page.

32 comments:

Julie said...

An excellent way to kick-start this specific theme day, Hilda. The example of Rizal is most apt and someone I knew nothing of.

Thank you for your post. The world is watching.

Jacob said...

Another wonderful historical commentary.

Petrea said...

Wow, Hilda, I never knew any of this. Thank you for the moving history.

Thanks also for the Avaaz link, which I had completely forgotten about. I hope our efforts will at the very least increase awareness. Dare we hope for more? As Julie says, the world is watching.

ellievellie said...

Interesting to know - the painting depicts the horrible act very artfully. The figure of the hero stands tall like a giant and the people who pull the triggers are so small and their names disappeared in history. Great picture!

Cezar and Léia said...

Wonderful words and many thanks for sharing the news!
Léia :-)

Don and Krise said...

A wonderful reminder of what freedom is about. Thank you for the links also.

Babooshka said...

I have learned something else here today of freedom. I hope many join us today, even just for one day waves can be felt.

Reena said...

this is i think one of the most prolific paintings of rizal's martyrdom. thanks hilda for reminding us of this. and for sharing his story for the world to see. :) you're really our ambassador. galing!!!

Lynette said...

Yes, this is filling a necessity so very well.

Ann said...

Interesting and appropriate post. I hope that by adding our voices we can raise awareness and let people know they are not forgotten by the rest of the world.

Dina said...

This painting and story in the context of this post is enough to bring tears to a blogger's eyes.

Julie ScottsdaleDailyPhoto.com said...

excellent photo to support the people of Iran and our missing fellow city daily photo blogger who we hope is released from custody soon.

Vogon Poet said...

I downloaded a copy of Rizal's work (in English) from Gutenberg Project after your post Maria Clara.
Let me quote the dedication to his Fatherland, where he says:
(...) And to this end, I will strive to reproduce thy condition faithfully, without discriminations; I will raise a part of the veil that covers the evil, sacrificing to truth everything, even vanity itself, since, as thy son, I am conscious that I also suffer from thy defects and weaknesses.

Mo said...

A superb image and words for todays support

m_m said...

Interesting history and very nice choice for today!

Jilly said...

You are so right, Hilda. Freedom of speech was what it was and is about - and wanting the right to vote and have it count. I hope our solidarity for Amir and for the Iranian people sends encouragement and let's them know the world is watching.

cieldequimper said...

Wonderful post for today, so interesting. Thanks Hilda!

Denton said...

Hilda, your post is very thoughtful and moving ... sadly what we witness today is not new to history ... sadly it will most likely not be the last of such violence against those who seek reform ... but history also shows us reason for hope as your post has so eloquently pointed out.

B SQUARED said...

Well said.

Small City Scenes said...

Excellent, Hilda. Thanks so much. MB

Jarart said...

Excellent post for the day, Hilda. Thank You fro that history.

the donG said...

rather than a sword and pistol, Rizal, through his writings and martyrdom, served as the catalyst for the Philippine Revolution.>>> its really great to think that our national hero's most powerful instrument was a pen. amazing!

Jim K said...

Moving post, that relates to todays events.

Laurie said...

This is so moving, Hilda. THank you. I've liked to the Avaaz petition on my post, too.

Ursel said...

Thank you for posting the history and link to the petition!

Dave-CostaRicaDailyPhoto.com said...

Outstanding post today, both educational and inspirational, and an excellent connection between the history of the Philippines and current events in iran.

Louis la Vache said...

Hilda, thank you for posting this and bringing more attention to the struggle for freedom in Iran.

Louis la Vache said...

«Louis» was pleased to read this evening that Amir has been released.

mateo said...

I'm glad for your support. I'd like to make you aware of this video. Jump to 00:27:10 if you don't like to watch the whole video. I think this is what most western countries deny but it is all connected.

kRiZ cPEc said...

thanks for sharing the bits of your national hero.

bathmate said...

Amazing so nice posting, I like it.
Bathmate

anztrelldc said...

As I know about Rizal, he is one of the national hero around the world who didn't start the revolution. Did you know that Rizal is even Half-Chinese? If I'm not mistaken, he is the 16th generation of the Lam-Co Tribe. Rizal even work at the spaniards during the war at the Cuba.

But for all the negative stuff that I have said, there is one positive thing that rhema in my mind, it only shows that war and killing each other isn't the only choice that we have.