January 10, 2009

Stop and shop

Wherever there is a busy transportation stop in Metro Manila, there are sure to be sidewalk vendors. The corner of Taft Avenue and Pedro Gil Street in the City of Manila has a light rail station, buses and jeepneys ply Taft, and Pedro Gil is a jeepney route. The vendors in this particular corner were selling peanuts and kikiam, slippers, sunglasses, and cellphone replacement covers, cases and chargers. And yes, Taft Avenue is named after William Howard Taft, the 27th president of the United States, who was the first civil governor of the Philippines (1901–1903) after the Spanish American War.

sidewalk vendors

25 comments:

George said...

It looks as if you can find just about anything on that corner. Thanks for the interesting picture.

Tanya said...

What an interesting view. How do they prepare the peanuts there? In Georgia, there are alot of little roadside stands that sell boiled peanuts. My kids loved them! We don't find them here in Va.

Abraham Lincoln said...

I looks like the food vendors are always doing more business than anybody else.

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Jarart said...

Interesting picture and good history lesson.

Jeannette said...

Congratulations on your award from Antonella. I received one as well. Nice to meet you!

metromanila said...

An interesting view on the sidewalk vendors. I am usually annoyed by them when I'm not desperately looking for something they might sell.

I'm one of those who are against changing Taft Avenue's name into something else. It's not because superficially it sounds better than Diokno Avenue, or just because I am one of those who have been attached to that strip under that name. I don't call myself pro-American either.

Changing street names is not only unnecessary. It also takes the history and sense of a certain place. The Binondo area and streets along España Boulevard had certain street names changed, and a part of their essence is gone.

Taft Avenue area from as far as Pasay up to the southern bank of Pasig River is like a short field trip back to the period in our history under the Americans- as the enclosed Intramuros was to Manila's past under Spain- Neoclassical buildings (Post Office, Natl Museum, old Agriculture and Finance, SC etc), a park after the War veteran who died during PH-US War (Lawton), neoclassical buildings adapted to tropical Philippines (PGH, UP), the American heritage of Public Education (UP Manila), the American Catholic School (DLSU), several Protestant churches and offices, including the Aglipayan Cathedral, US era 'mansions' (Vito Cruz area), a boulevard after the Battle of Manila Bay- Spanish-US War commodore(Dewey, now Roxas) and its art deco lowrises, Jones (legislation promising independence), MacArthur (build up military and war plans, albeit late) and Quezon (Commonwealth chief exec) bridges, and tons more.

Taft of course served primarily the US gov't above anything else. It's his job. But he's no less deserving than any other personality in that era of Philippine history.The other significant personalities can have their names on streets in newly developed areas, those who are not worthy should be humble enough, and the legislators can do more functional laws other than renaming streets. It's a crime, literally.

angela said...

Good shot from above, Hilda. I see these kiosks from time to time here but they're almost always selling food or sweets.

Lois said...

What an interesting historical fact about Taft. I never knew that!

Marc said...

Looks like a nice spot to pause for a while and have a snack.

lunarossa said...

So nice and colour ful, Hilda. Feel like jumping into it and explore all their merchadises!!! Have a nice Sunday. Ciao. A.

mkhansen said...

I like your perspective in this shot, Hilda. This photo really gives me a feel for a Manila sidewalk. And very interesting information. (I must say, I learned something from metromanila's comment, too.)

gogouci said...

I like the view from above perspective. It's like looking through a microscope, you can see so much more.

PJ said...

Here in the US, unless you're in a big city, street vendors are not thought of very highly. I wish we had more of them, selling these kinds of items, little things to pick up along a walk to somewhere.

Saretta said...

We have these vendors all over the place here in Italy. The people selling are usually either from Africa or Asia. I often stop by to pick up cheap jewelry that looks more expensive than it is! ;-)

Every town also has its weekly street market where Italian vendors sell their wares.

hadv said...

Oh, I didn't know that about the Taft name. Never even questioned it was named after an American president. Just thought it was.. you know..an atrociously busy street hahaha.

Eki Akhwan said...

This looks like a familiar sight to me, Hilda. It could be in Bandung or Jakarta or many other big cities in Indonesia ... Hmmmm ...

nobu said...

I like this angle, nice photo.

by the way, the bridge you have seen in the museum is a model of nihonbashi in Edo era.
It was same place to current nihonbashi.

the donG said...

i miss that area. i used to visit pedro gil because i buy comics at robinsons manila. ever since that shop closed i rarely had the chance to visit it.

Jackie said...

I love the perspective Hilda!

Destitute Rebel said...

Quite an interesting angle, love the shot, seems like a lively market.

Joe Narvaez said...

Brings back the memories... I used to live and study near here. Mahal ko ang Taft at P. Gil.

Ruby said...

I love the fact that you took this from above - it gives a great view in to the street below. On my last blog I did a "Through a window" series - this has just reminded me of it! Was it through a window?

Hilda said...

Anthony:
Seems I touched on a nerve. But I agree with you. There is nothing unpatriotic about keeping the old street names. It would be a loss if our young ones don't know the historical significance of areas in Manila.

PJ:
They're not thought of very highly here either. Especially when they encroach on the street! Used to be a major problem, until the government started getting strict about where they could set up their tables or carts.

Ruby:
I took this from the elevated light rail station while waiting for the train to come in :)

LEon said...

Look very interesting. Must have some bargain food and stuff.

Ming the Merciless said...

We have a giant supermarket called Stop N Shop. :-)

But I think I would rather shop where you're at.