May 12, 2009

A lesson in marketing

Despite the popularity of commercially produced gin, rum and beer, certain regions in the Philippines still produce their unique, indigenous liquors. Of course, with questionable manufacturing hygiene, much of the liquor cannot be marketed locally, much less internationally. In the past two decades, small companies have taken it upon themselves to produce commercially acceptable Philippine local liquors so now it's not too difficult to buy tuba, lambanog (which is 80–90 proof) and basi in Metro Manila. The company that produces these two went one step further: it hired the services of the Institut Oenologique de Champagne to create a coconut wine and refine the basi so that they could be accepted internationally. Malakan'yan, which was specially commissioned for the 1998 Philippine centennial, is a wine made from the water of young coconuts. The bottle is handcrafted from real coconut shell which makes each piece unique. 1807 is basi, a sugarcane liquor native to the Ilocos region. It is named after the 1807 Basi Revolt when the Ilocanos finally rebelled against the Spanish colonial government for expropriating the manufacture and sale of basi.

bottles of Malakan'yan cocovino and 1807 basi

19 comments:

Halcyon said...

I'm not sure if I would like what's inside - but the bottle is definitely neat!

Lois said...

I would definitely buy it just for the bottle!

Jacob said...

Very interesting. We've had folks up in the hills making their own liquor (moonshine) for years, all the while being hunted and chased by officers of the federal government.

Many movies, as you know, have been made about the Moonshiners.

Maybe your way is better...make the moonshine legal.

George said...

I agree that these bottles are interesting -- probably worth the purchase themselves. I saw a news report that local distilleries are growing in popularity here in parts of the U. S.

Cezar and Léia said...

Hello dear Hilda!
These bottles are definitely beautiful!
I'm not fan of these kind of drinks ! I could buy one just to keep the bottle ! :-)
Léia

Olivier said...

un vin de noix de coco ? je me demande quel gout cela peut il bien avoir, je serais assez curieux de gouter, cela doit être très sucré non ?
a wine of coconut? I wonder what gout it can it definitely have, I would be rather curious to try, it must be very sweet not?

Don and Krise said...

Very unique. I agree, those seem like collector's items. Very informative Hilda. Thank you.

Jarart said...

"put de lime in de coconut and then you feel better..." Old, old song, sorry. I do like that bottle!

Vogon Poet said...

When I was young and my parents had a house in the country, I happily moonshined my grappa. The produce was very appreciated by friends and relatives!
No bottle like yours anyway...

Jackie said...

Cool, I love the bottles!

Ursel said...

Great idea to make the bottle from coconut shell. Now I'd love to taste the wine.

gogouci said...

Very clever to use the coconuts as a "bottle". Perfect picture. Maybe you can market you photo.

PAK said...

I like such original bottles. Small companies tries to produce local specials almost everywhere!

the donG said...

very very interesting. very native yet it looks good for export.

Hilda said...

Olivier:
Coconut liquor is not sweet at all.

Tamera said...

I can't imagine the hangover this stuff must cause! But very cool presentation for sure. Tamera

Marc said...

Coconut wine sounds great. Nice looking bottles too!

sam said...

whre can we buy this wine? about a hundred pieces and can give us cheaper prices?

Hilda said...

Sam:
I just bought them at the Filipiniana section of SM Department Store as a gift to my brother-in-law. You will have to contact the supplier about your inquiry. I do not have anything to do with the manufacturer. Good luck.